ANY ITEM that looks like a gun will have to be licensed under several changes to the Weapons Act being considered by the Queensland State Government.

Even guns made out of materials as unlikely as soap or plastic may have to be kept under lock and key if they could “reasonably be taken to be a weapon”.

The draft act says an imitation is a “reasonable copy” of a weapon that is not capable of causing death or injury.

“If it looks like a gun and feels like a gun, it will have to be licensed,” said a government source.

“We just want to know where they are.”

It is unclear how the draft affects toy guns.

Failure to license an imitation weapon will carry a maximum $4500 fine under the proposals and incorrect storage carries a penalty of $750.


The proposed changes will also impose restrictions on the ownership of laser pointers, tougher penalties for selling items such as crossbows, bullet proof vests and knuckledusters without the appropriate licence, and stricter rules on firearm storage. In certain circumstances, religion will be a lawful excuse for carrying a knife and police who take their service-issue firearms home will be exempted.

A discussion draft of the Act will be available on the Queensland Police website today and Police Minister Neil Roberts encouraged responses.

But firearm owners’ groups have condemned the measures as cumbersome and misguided.

Christopher Ray from the Law Abiding Firearms Owners said legitimate owners were being “regulated out of existence”.

“We just wanted some of the burden, some of the bureaucracy and some of the paperwork taken off our backs,” Mr Ray said. “Instead, they’re complicating it further for law-abiding people. If we make a single minor mistake we can lose our (gun) licence for five years.”

He said LAFO was also opposed to police being given “free rein” to take their guns home and leave them on the bedside table.

Geoff Jones, state president of the Sporting Shooters Association, said the crackdown on imitation weapons risked making “otherwise law-abiding people into criminals”.

Mr Roberts said a requirement for permanently deactivated public monuments such as weapons on display in RSL buildings to be registered or licensed had been removed from the draft act.

(news source http://www.news.com.au/weird-true-freaky/toy-guns-will-have-to-be-licensed-in-queensland-under-new-firearms-laws/story-e6frflri-1225900910503)

Advertisements